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4/23/06

Disrespecting a Hu


 

By Carolyn Kay

I canít help but think it was no accident that the Falun Gong woman got in to Huís welcoming ceremony.  There are huge security staffs to keep this kind of thing from happening.  From The New York Times:

The Chinese Embassy in Washington sent a delegation to the White House on Friday to demand a detailed explanation of how an adherent of the Falun Gong spiritual sect, which is banned in China, managed to infiltrate the welcome ceremony for Mr. Hu on the South Lawn of the White House on Thursday and heckle Mr. Hu for several minutes before being escorted away.

And there were other slights, despite the huge protocol staffs, to keep such things from happening.  From the same article:

The reception for Mr. Hu was further marred when a White House announcer confused the official name of China with that of its archrival, Taiwan, while introducing China's national anthem. Separately, photographs show that as the event ended, President Bush first steered Mr. Hu to leave the podium and then, realizing he had done so prematurely, grabbed the Chinese leader by the arm and pulled him back into the proper position.

The protocol problems may have had more resonance than the nature of the small slights would suggest because Mr. Hu's visit did not achieve any significant breakthroughs and the Chinese always emphasize careful staging of major political events.

Then thereís Cheney falling asleep in one of the meetings.

I think these slights were purposeful.  Letting the protester in to the welcoming ceremony could also have been a sop to Bushís fundamentalist Christian base, since Karl Rove rarely lets pass an opportunity for a twofer.

Bush apparently thinks he can influence Hu by being disrespectful to him.  Just as he browbeats and smears everyone who doesnít give him exactly what he wants.

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